The (still) mysterious roots of female sexual desire

In a commentary piece for the Archives of Sexual Behavior, my co-author, Dr. Pepper Schwartz, and I debate the merits of the newly proposed Relational and Bodily Experiences Theory of female sexual desire.

Is sexual desire determined by how a woman was raised to value her sexuality? Alternatively, perhaps desire is biological in nature, having more to do with hormonal changes than oppressive or supportive childhood experiences.  Or maybe it’s all about her current relationship satisfaction, and when she is happiest she feels more interested in sex. These are all issues we take on in our newly published commentary.

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The opioid crisis is hitting the LGBTQ community

This article appears on the Andrew Christian website. Click here to be taken to the full-length version.

A new study out of New York University’s School of Medicine finds that LGBTQ people are particularly at risk for opioid prescription misuse. Some of us may not be that shocked by the findings—after all, gay men have been in the vanguard of recreational drug use for decades. But we aren’t talking about party drugs here.

Opioids are highly addictive painkillers that interfere with almost every aspect of human life (from eroding basic motor skills to disabling our mental capacity for undertaking important life events). The prescriptions’ potential for destroying daily life goes beyond our subjective well-being; in 2017 nearly 50,000 people died from an opioid overdose. That calculates to about 130 opioid deaths per day between 2016-2017 according to the US Department of Health & Human Services.

This new report sheds light on a rarely discussed piece of the opioid epidemic: how and why the opioid crisis is hurting LGBTQ communities more than heterosexual ones. Researchers found that reported misuse among straight men (5.3%) and women (3.7%) was significantly lower than rates reported by gay men (10%) and lesbians (6.8%). Even more troubling, bisexual women showed a markedly high misuse rate (13.5%) as did bisexual men (8.3%), though to a lesser degree than the bisexual women sampled.

NYU’s findings are particularly interesting because they illustrate how gender and sexual orientation interact to produce specific societal trends. In this case, bisexual women seem to be a sociological phenomenon. I say this because, historically, women have lower rates of drug abuse whereas men (especially single men) are considered the exemplar of “at risk” populations. However, when we use sexual orientation as a second level of analysis alongside gender, a frightening new trend is uncovered with bisexual women showing unprecedented rates of opioid prescription misuse.

Why are LGBTQ people experiencing this striking difference in opioid misuse?

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Gay marriage: Does a ring make a difference?

This article appears on the Andrew Christian website. Click here to be taken to the full-length version. 

There was a lot of built up anxiety (mostly from the right) surrounding how same-sex marriage would forever alter American family and mating patterns. TV pundits, conservative politicians and religious leaders often focused on same-sex parenting, adoption rights, relationship durability, and ominous “slippery slope” scenarios where hypothetically legalizing same-sex marriage would lead to a country where humans could marry whomever or, even more perplexing, whatever they felt like. Thankfully in 2015, sanity prevailed and the LGBTQ community achieved the right to marry.

But now, nearly four years after the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of same-sex marriage, can we say gays and lesbians getting married has really changed anything?

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5 Things Straight Couples Could Learn From Gay Sex

The following is an excerpt from an article I was invited to write for the Andrew Christian blog.

If we’re to believe what the porn industry tells us, straight people have an endless supply of sexual inventiveness. But the porn industry isn’t exactly known for being realistic. Moving past online fantasies and into reality, a survey on real-life U.S. couples found that 30 percent of men and 19 percent of women desire more diversity in the bedroom.

I spend my days researching sex and relationships (and, yes, it’s as fun as it sounds), but I often find myself chatting with heterosexual couples who look bewildered after I suggest they try a sexual behavior that gay men commonly enlist in their bedrooms. The couples then inform me that they’ve never heard of such an act, not to mention attempted it. And the truth is that so many behaviors we consider “gay” can easily be adapted for straight couples.

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Psychology Today: A Sexual Revolution Is Happening…Again

There’s yet another movement towards sexual fulfillment.

The sexual revolutions of the twentieth century did a lot: the legalization of birth control and contraceptives, giving women the right to vote, criminalizing marital rape, introducing the one night stand and casual sex for both men and women, among other things. But these progressive trends toward sexual liberalism didn’t reach the older generations of their respective times.

Now that Baby Boomers are reaching old age, however, this is likely to change.

Sociologist Barbara Risman, Ph.D. and I dive into this new leg of the Sexual Revolution in our new Psych Today article. Read up!

10 Best Aphrodisiacs, According to Science

We’ve all heard of so many alleged aphrodisiacs that if all of them were the real deal, we’d be getting it on 24/7. Work, family, children…what are those again?

With the list of possible aphrodisiacs growing day-after-day, it’s time we take a look at what science has to say about these desire enhancers.

In my article up now on Jen Reviews, I trace the historical lineage of aphrodisiacs, dispell myths around some of the most common aphrodisiacs, and (most importantly) give a no-nonsense guide to 10 of the best libido boosters out there, according to science.

Dig in and get down to it!

Jen Reviews has been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, The Guardian, Cosmopolitan, Greatist, Life Hacker and Dr. Axe

Press release: The push and pull of sex, gender, and aging

This is a briefing paper originally prepared for and published on the Council on Contemporary Families’ website on August 7, 2018. 

Not too long ago, women were considered “over the hill” once they reached middle age. Women in the 1960s recalled being told that their fate was to be “fat at 40, finished at 50.” But over the last two decades the U.S. has seen a massive shift in older adults’ attitudes towards sex, romance, and intimacy, with women in particular feeling emboldened to remain sexually and romantically satisfied throughout their entire life cycle, not just when they are young. Heterosexual partners tend to become more egalitarian as they age, and the majority of divorces that do occur after age 50 are initiated by women. Matchmaking sites have given older women far more chances to find partners than in the past, while men can now take Viagra or Cialis in order to keep their sex lives vibrant and healthy.

Desexualized? Who is on the hook for cosmetic surgery?

There are challenges of course, and many of those challenges are starkly gendered. After menopause, women are frequently seen as non-sexual beings, something we call the desexualization of older women. Men on the other hand have been given lifelong statuses as sexual beings and seldom face societal obstacles to romantic contact later in life. To compensate for this gender double standard, many women have resorted to surgical interventions to reduce the signs of age on their body—in fact, they make up the largest growing market for cosmetic surgery. Other women have decided to forgo relationships and sex entirely, relying on social networks of friends to support them emotionally instead of intimate partners. Fortunately for the many women who continue to date later in life, the research concludes that their sexual satisfaction and frequencies are fairly high.

Resexualized. Stars might suggest older faces that are sexy.

What our review, “Gender and Sexuality in Aging,” in The Handbook of the Sociology of Gender, best illustrates is that Baby Boomers have become far more liberal in regard to sex, and when older men and women prioritize lifelong sexual satisfaction they have a better shot at achieving it today than ever before. Gender, sexual orientation, race, and other demographic factors affect Boomers’ success at this, and U.S. culture as a whole is just beginning to value intimacy as a lifelong goal. But with older faces becoming “sexy” (think Alfre Woodard at 65, Meryl Streep at 69. Or  Denzel Washington at 63, Tom Selleck at 73) and more attention being given to the study of sex and aging (see the endowed professorship in sexuality and aging at the University of Minnesota), we are seeing progressive shifts in our mainstream culture towards making older bodies less stigmatized and more romanticized.